All posts in Scot McKnight

Don’t Miss Tom Wright on Fox & Friends


If there is a speaker that I have listened to the most, without a doubt it is Tom Wright. I would love to attend this event taking place this summer where N.T. Wright will be speaking at a conference on Paul’s letter to the Galatians & Christian Theology at St Andrews in Scotland.

The dates are July 10-13th. I would go, but I’ll be In California and/or Oregon about that time.

If you can’t make it to that conference you might enjoy reading his interview with Christian.co.uk, where Tom discusses his latest book, How God Became King: The Forgotten Story of the Gospels
, and more. I am in the middle of How God Became King as well as Scot McKnight’s complementary book, The King Jesus Gospel: The Original Good News Revisited. I will be reviewing both of them very soon.. Yes, I am half way through both, and they are quite excellent so far.. Well, if that is not a good enough recommend then I will do a better review as I said, very soon..

Last of all you can watch him on FOX & FRIENDS where he will be interviewed for a special Easter show on Sunday, April 8, 2012!

The interview will focus on two of his books, his newest HOW GOD BECAME KING, as well as his seminal work considered a new Christian classic, SIMPLY JESUS
. Yes, I have read Simply Jesus as well. And yes, it is recommended. I will review it properly as well very very soon..



A Text Without A Context Is A Pretext For A Prooftext


I was just listening to a talk by Greg Boyd where he was saying, “A text without a context is a pretext for a prooftext” . I don’t know if it is orignal to Boyd, but it was a punchy and well placed statement within what are usually really encouraging sermons by Boyd. He was talking about the importance of exegeting the scriptures within their original and occasional contexts.  Greg was talking about how so many verses and sentences from the bible are often quoted with total disregard for the meaning and context from which they come from.  It really is a good message. Listen to it over at Woodland Hills’ website.

It reminded me of the great blog post I was reading this week over at Jesus Creed.  Scot Mcknight was registering his disappointment along with Ed Stetzer about the mismanaged journalism concerning a recent interview of Rick Warren . It reminds me of what happened on the blogosphere when Rob’s Love Wins hadn’t been released yet.   It turns out it was a simply “a text without a context” that became “a pretext for a prooftext”.

Hermes, Hermeneutics, Exegesis

Hermes is considered the inventor of language and speech

Scott McKnight’s “A Community Called Atonement”

Atonement Theology, or how we understand the meaning and consequence of the death of Jesus on a Roman cross has been a much discussed topic in the last decade. I believe this is a very good thing to be asking these big questions about what is at the very heart of the Christian Faith.

If my history is right, we have William Tyndale to thank for the coinage of our english word atonement.  Atonement being a concatenation of the words ‘At One’ to describe Christ’s work of restoring a good relationship — a reconciliation — between God and people.

If you are like me, you came out of a tradition that explained the totality of what Jesus did through the Cross strictly in Penal Substitutionary terms. This might have been the only lens in which you have seen what Christ has done for us. According to Wikipedia:

Penal substitution (sometimes, esp. in older writings, called forensic theory) is a theory of the atonement within Christian Theology, developed with the Reformed tradition. It argues that Christ, by his own sacrificial choice, was punished (penalised) in the place of sinners (substitution), thus satisfying  the demands of justice so God can justly forgive the sins. It is thus a specific understanding of substitutionary atonement, where the substitutionary nature of Jesus’ death is understood in the sense of a substitutionary punishment.”

Along with this strict interpretation, the dots might not have been connected between Jesus “Kingdom”message and his death on a Roman cross.

In Scott McKnight’s book, “A Community Called Atonement: Living Theology“, he argues quite persuasively for a more comprehensive and varied understanding of the atoning work of Jesus. Scott begins his exploration and explanation of the atonement by likening the various New Testament atonement metaphors to the many golf-clubs that are needed in playing a good game of Golf. He says if we were to only use one club/metaphor for an exhaustive explanation of what is happening with Jesus going to the cross then we will be playing a very poor game of golf.

Scott explores the proper understanding or Metaphors; the reality to which they point as well as a metaphors limits . He explores the question, “What did Jesus think of his death?”  He gives good summary of the main atonement metaphor categories: Identification for Incorporation, Recapitulation, Ransom/Christus Victor, Satisfaction, Substituion, Representation, Penal Substitution.  I feel that Scott McKnight has done us all a great service by  framing the atonement in the manner that he has. Thank you. : )